Publications on River Restoration in Europe

This page gathers the most interesting case studies, best practices and other relevant studies on River Restoration in Europe. Feel free to download the publications and share them among your network.

Current publications | Search

Dam Removal: A viable solution for the future of our European Rivers

With only 40 percent of Europe’s waterways in good condition, a new study published today calls for tens of thousands of redundant dams and other barriers to be removed to help restore rivers and lakes – boosting wildlife populations and benefiting communities across the continent. A new initiative called Dam Removal Europe aims to start an era of dam removal.

Download Dam-Removal-Europe-Report-2018.pdf

 Read more ...

Restoration of river continuity: model initiatives across France and Europe.

Summarry  of a day workshop organised by the French Agency for Biodiversity on 9 November 2017 in the Paris region (Ile-de-France), with the Yvette valley hydraulic-development syndicate (SIAHVY) and the regional nature park of the upper Chevreuse valley during the 1st European Centre for River Restoration General Members' Meeting held in France.

Download: Restoration of river continuty:.pdf

 Read more ...

From Sea to Source 2.0

This new book released on World Fish Migration Day (April 21) provides a practical guide to tackle the threat of dams and promoting the protection and restoration of fish migration in rivers worldwide. “From sea to source 2.0” is a unique collaboration of over 100 international fisheries professionals and is supported by river managers, governments, research institutes and NGOs including WWF and the Nature Conservatory. Aimed at practitioners but also a wonderful resource for the general public, the book is full of inspiring stories, hard lessons learned and great successes from nearly every continent on the planet. The book can be downloaded for free at www.fromseatosource.com

 Read more ...

The Participation of Stakeholders and the Civil Society in the Basins of Rivers, Lakes and Aquafiers.

Nowhere in the world is there a single manager who is solely responsible for the governance of freshwater resources, their related structures and services! If the national administrations and their agencies enable to define the institutional framework, to implement and manage the main structuring infrastructure and then to mobilize part of the funding, the regional and local authorities, like the States of a federation, the Provinces or the municipalities, but also farmers, companies, fishermen and other economic stakeholders play a key role, with the associations and NGOs, for mobilizing the citizens and carrying out many local projects that contribute to the success of the River Basin Management Plans. The implementation of many decisions is only possible when there is a strong commitment and if all public and private, collective or individual stakeholders concerned are mobilized.

Download Participation of stakeholders.pdf

 Read more ...

The Handbook on Water Information Systems; Administration, Processing and Exploitation of Water-related Data.

Access to data and information on the status and evolution of the water resource and its uses is a crucial component for any water policy implementation. Unfortunately, the necessary data are often produced and managed by several organizations in different sectors, with little coordination among themselves and in many cases the information available for decision making and public information is not fully adapted to the needs. Today, efforts must be increased to develop the production and the access to water-related data and information in an effective and sustainable way, developing synergies, combining the various resources and data sources, and using procedures and tools adapted to needs.

Download The handbook on water information systems.pdf

 Read more ...

One hundred priority questions for landscape restoration in Europe

A new paper published in the journal Biological Conservation identifies 100 questions that, if answered, would make a significant difference to the restoration of Europe’s terrestrial and marine environments. The questions, identified by a group of restoration experts including researchers, practitioners and policy makers, cover all aspects of landscape restoration in Europe, and will help to set priorities and new directions for research and policy.

Download Hundred priority questions for landscape restoration in Europe.pdf

 Read more ...

Benefits of European River Restoration Schemes

The analysis has been carried out through a review of existing databases, including the LIFE+ RESTORE wiki, the FP7 REFORM wiki, and some national databases. This report aims to underpin the replication of successful river restoration initiatives across the regions and to give suggestions on how to improve the way that European water policy can be implemented.

Benefits of European River Restoration Schemes.pdf

 Read more ...

ECRR Newsletter 3/2017 December

With this issue of the ECRR Newsletter it appears that there is an increasing interest to publish about ecological river restoration. Moreover, there is a certain development in the type of articles about this item. The content of the articles on river restoration shows nowadays more diversity than in the past. This proves to our opinion, that river restoration is becoming more and more a well known and even cross cutting activity, not only related to nature conservation and protection of specific flora and fauna species. Ecological (river) restoration, defined as the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or estroyed, is more and more recognized as an activity being key to delivering essential cosystem services (Aichi Biodiversity Target 14).

Newsletter ECRR December 3/2017.pdf

 Read more ...

AN ANALYSIS OF RIVER FRAGMANTATION IN THE SPANISH RIVER BASINS

Rivers are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world (Dudgeon et al 2006), especially affected by the longitudinal disconnection of the fluvial systems. Longitudinal connectivity in rivers is an extremely important concept that is altered by human activities such as flow regulation produced by dams, weirs and other barriers, disrupting the upstream-downstream linkages in the river (Ward 1989). The loss of longitudinal connectivity in rivers is a major problem worldwide as a result of the dam development (Gought et al. 2012).

Dams and weirs are necessary for human activities; they support agriculture and industry, provide water for human consumption, prevent flooding and also generate electricity. All this makes the dams important for society and, for this reason, they is no general intention to manage the passability of these obstacles.

Spain is one of the countries with the largest number of damsin the world. The existence of more than 1,500 large dams is documented (MAPAMA 2016). Of the total, 353 are state-owned and 1185 belong to private owners.

Download An-Analysis-of-River-Fragmentation-in-the-Spanish-River-Basins

 Read more ...
Pages: 1 of 23